大家论坛

 找回密码
 注册
查看: 1054|回复: 3

[阅读] 名著双语阅读红字-第四章 会面

[复制链接]

1万

主题

2万

帖子

16万

金币

大家网博士后

Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22

积分
98524
发表于 2009-6-18 15:42 | 显示全部楼层 |阅读模式
Chapter 4


AFTER her return to the prison, Hester Prynne was found to be in a state of nervous excitement that demanded constant watchfulness, lest she should perpetrate violence on herself, or do some half-frenzied mischief to the poor babe. As night approached, it proving impossible to quell her insubordination by rebuke or threats of punishment, Master Brackett, the jailer, thought fit to introduce a physician. He described him as a man of skill in all Christian modes of physical science, and likewise familiar with whatever the savage people could teach, in respect to medicinal herbs and roots that grew in the forest. To say the truth, there was much need of professional assistance, not merely for Hester herself, but still more urgently for the child; who, drawing its sustenance from the maternal bosom, seemed to have drank in with it all the turmoil, the anguish and despair, which pervaded the mother's system. It now writhed in convulsions of pain, and was a forcible type, in its little frame, of the moral agony which Hester Prynne had borne throughout the day.

Closely following the jailer into the dismal apartment, appeared that individual of singular aspect, whose presence in the crowd had been of such deep interest to the wearer of the scarlet letter. He was lodged in the prison, not as suspected of any offence, but as the most convenient and suitable mode of disposing of him, until the magistrates should have conferred with the Indian sagamores respecting his ransom. His name was announced as Roger Chillingworth. The jailer, after ushering him into the room, remained a moment, marvelling at the comparative quiet that followed his entrance; for Hester Prynne had immediately become as still as death, although the child continued to moan.

"Prithee, friend, leave me alone with my patient," said the practitioner. "Trust me, good jailer, you shall briefly have peace in your house; and, I promise you, Mistress Prynne shall hereafter be more amenable to just authority than you may have found her heretofore."

"Nay, if your worship can accomplish that," answered Master Brackett, "I shall own you for a man of skill indeed! Verily, the woman hath been like a possessed one; and there lacks little, that I should take in hand to drive Satan out of her with stripes."

The stranger had entered the room with the characteristic quietude of the profession to which he announced himself as belonging. Nor did his demeanour change, when the withdrawal of the prison keeper left him face to face with the woman, whose absorbed notice of him, in the crowd, had intimated so close a relation between himself and her. His first care was given to the child; whose cries, indeed, as she lay writhing on the trundle-bed, made it of peremptory necessity to postpone all other business to the task of soothing her. He examined the infant carefully, and then proceeded to unclasp a leathern case, which he took from beneath his dress. It appeared to contain medical preparations, one of which he mingled with a cup of water.

"My old studies in alchemy," observed he, "and my sojourn, for above a year past, among a people well versed in the kindly properties of simples, have made a better physician of me than many that claim the medical degree. Here, woman! The child is yours- she is none of mine- neither will she recognise my voice or aspect as a father's. Administer this draught, therefore, with thine own hand."

Hester repelled the offered medicine, at the same time gazing with strongly marked apprehension into his face.

"Wouldst thou avenge thyself on the innocent babe?" whispered she.

"Foolish woman!" responded the physician, half coldly, half soothingly. "What should ail me, to harm this misbegotten and miserable babe? The medicine is potent for good; and were it my child-yea, mine own, as well as thine!- I could do no better for it."

As she still hesitated, being, in fact, in no reasonable state of mind, he took the infant in his arms, and himself administered the draught. It soon proved its efficacy, and redeemed the leech's pledge. The moans of the little patient subsided; its convulsive tossings gradually ceased; and, in a few moments, as is the custom of young children after relief from pain, it sank into a profound and dewy slumber. The physician, as he had a fair right to be termed, next bestowed his attention on the mother. With calm and intent scrutiny, he felt her pulse, looked into her eyes- a gaze that made her heart shrink and shudder, because so familiar, and yet so strange and cold- and, finally, satisfied with his investigation, proceeded to mingle another draught.

"I know not Lethe nor Nepenthe," remarked he; "but I have learned many new secrets in the wilderness, and here is one of them- a recipe that an Indian taught me, in requital of some lessons of my own, that were as old as Paracelsus. Drink it! It may be less soothing than a sinless conscience. That I cannot give thee. But it will calm the swell and heaving of thy passion, like oil thrown on the waves of a tempestuous sea."

He presented the cup to Hester, who received it with a slow, earnest look into his face; not precisely a look of fear, yet full of doubt and questioning, as to what his purposes might be. She looked also at her slumbering child.

"I have thought of death," said she- "have wished for it- would even have prayed for it, were it fit that such as I should pray for anything. Yet, if death be in this cup, I bid thee think again, ere thou beholdest me quaff it. See! It is even now at my lips."

"Drink, then," replied he, still with the same cold composure. "Dost thou know me so little, Hester Prynne? Are my purposes wont to be so shallow? Even if I imagine a scheme of vengeance, what could I do better for my object than to let thee live- than to give thee medicines against all harm and peril of life- so that this burning shame may still blaze upon thy bosom!" As he spoke, he laid his long forefinger on the scarlet letter, which forthwith seemed to scorch into Hester's breast, as if it had been red-hot. He noticed her involuntary gesture, and smiled. "Live, therefore, and bear about thy doom with thee, in the eyes of men and women- in the eyes of him whom thou didst call thy husband- in the eyes of yonder child! And, that thou mayest live, take off this draught."

Without further expostulation or delay, Hester Prynne drained the cup, and, at the motion of the man of skill, seated herself on the bed where the child was sleeping; while he drew the only chair which the room afforded, and took his own seat beside her. She could not but tremble at these preparations; for she felt that- having now done all that humanity, or principle, or, if so it were, a refined cruelty, impelled him to do, for the relief of physical suffering- he was next to treat with her as the man whom she had most deeply and irreparably injured.
回复

使用道具 举报

1万

主题

2万

帖子

16万

金币

大家网博士后

Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22

积分
98524
 楼主| 发表于 2009-6-18 15:43 | 显示全部楼层
第四章 会面
  

海丝特·白兰返回监狱之后,便陷入一阵神经质的激动之中,必须有人片刻不离地看守着她,以防止她作出自戕之举,或在一时狂乱之中对可怜的婴儿有所伤害。夜幕将临,人们发现无论是大声呵斥抑或是以惩罚作威胁,对于她的不顺从都无济于事,看守布莱基特先生便主张请一个医生来给她看看。按照他的介绍,那医生不但精通基督教的各种医术,面且熟谙从野蛮人那里学来的长在林间的一切草药。老实讲,需要医生诊治的,不仅是海丝特本人,倒是那孩子更为急迫。由于她要从母亲的乳汁中汲取营养,似乎同时吸进了渗透在母亲肌体中的一切骚动、痛楚和绝望。此时,她正在痛苦的痉挛中扭动着,那小小的身躯成了海丝特·白兰一天中所忍受的精神上的极度痛苦的有力的具体表现。  

那个外表奇特的陌生人紧跟在看守身后走进了凄凉的牢房,他上午在人群中露面的时候,曾经引起了红字佩戴者的深切注意。长官们后来安排他暂时栖身狱中,倒不是担心他会作出什么有害之举,而是在和印第安头人们协商他的赎身问题之前,只有如此才最为方便妥善。据称他名叫罗杰·齐灵渥斯。看守把他领进牢房之后,刚逗留了片刻,室内居然随那人的到来而安静下来,使看守颇为诧异;此时婴儿虽然依旧呻唤不止,海丝特·白兰却立刻象死去一般地僵呆了。

“朋友,请让我和我的病人单独呆一会儿,”那医生说道。“请相信我吧,好看守,你管的这间牢房很快就会安静下来的;而且我还向你保证,白兰太太将从此遵从执法长官,不会再象原先那样了。”

“嘿,要是你老先生能够做到这一条,”布莱基特看守回答说,“我可要承认你真是手到病除了!真的,这女人一直象是魔鬼缠身;我简直使尽了招数,就差用鞭子把撤旦从她身上赶走啦。”

陌生人心平气和地走进牢房,那态度倒和他自称的医生职业相称。看守退出以后,只剩他和那女人面面相对时,他依然平静如初,尽管她在人群中曾经那么专注地望着他,已经说明他俩之间的关系密切异常。他先诊视那孩子,是啊,那婴儿躺在轮床上辗转哭泣,使他不能不撇下其它,把平息她作为当务之急,他仔细地诊视了孩子,然后从怀里掏出一个皮匣。里面象是装着药物,他取出一粒,搅进一杯水里。

“我过去对炼金术的研究,”他述说着,“再加上过去一年里生活在一个精通草药品性的民族中间,使我比许多科班出身的医生更高明。听我说,妇人!这孩于是你的——和我毫无血缘——她也不会把我的音容认作是她父亲的。所以,还是由你亲手给她喂药吧。”

海丝特推开了他举着的那剂药,两眼疑虑重重地紧盯着他的面孔。

“你打算在这无辜的婴儿身上发泄你的仇恨吗?”她悄声说。

“愚蠢的女人!”那医生不冷不热地应道。“加害于这样一个不幸的私生婴儿,难道我发疯了?给她喝下去会药到病除的;即使她是我的孩子——对,既是我的,当然也就是你的!——我也没有更好的药了。”

她仍然迟疑不决,事实上,她的头脑此时已经不清醒了。他便借机抱过婴儿,亲自给她喂了药。药力很快便见了效,看来医生说话算数。患病的小家伙的呻唤平息了,痉挛般的扭动也逐渐停止了,过了一会儿,她就象病儿解除痛苦之后惯见的那样,香甜地进入了梦乡。那医生如今可以当之无愧了,这才探视作母亲的:他仔细认真、专心致志地为她摸脉,还观察她的眼睛——他的盯视本是如此熟悉,此时却陌生而冷酷,只看得她的心都抽搐了,收紧了——最后,他满意地结束了诊断,开始调和另一剂药。

“我不懂得什么迷魂汤或忘忧草之类的东西,”他说道,“但我在那些野蛮人中间学到了许多新诀窍,这里的就是其中一种——这是一个印第安人教给我的一种偏方,以报答我传授给他的象巴拉塞尔苏斯①那样一些老掉牙的知识。喝下去吧!这药也许不如一颗无罪的良心那样让人舒服。那种良心我可没办法给你。不过,这剂药象是把油倒在暴风雨掀起的海浪上,总可以平息你那澎湃翻腾的情欲。”

他把杯子端给海丝特,而她在接过杯子的时候,眼睛缓缓地打量着他的面孔,她的目光中说不上有什么恐惧,倒是充满了怀疑和探究,想弄清他的目的何在。她接着又看了看她那熟睡的孩子。

“我想到过死,”她说,——“我巴不得去死——甚至还祈祷过上帝要我去死,如果我还能够有所祈求的话。不过,要是这杯药可以致我于死地,在你眼看着我一口吞下去之前,我请求你再想一想。看!杯子已经沾到我嘴唇了。”

“那就喝吧,”他回答着,依然冷酷如前,不动声色。“难道你这么不了解我吗,海丝特·白兰?我的目标会如此浅薄吗?即使我心里想着复仇的念头,为了达到我的目标;比起让你活着——比起给你药吃,让你解除身体的危害——以便让这灼热的耻辱可以继续烧烫你的胸膛,难道我还有什么更高明的作法吗?”他一边说着,一边把长长的食指放到那红字上,那字立刻火烧火燎地象是烙进了海丝特的胸膛。他注意到她那不由自主的姿势,微微一笑。“所以说,还是活下去吧,在男男女女的眼前,——在你确曾称作丈夫的人眼前,——在这个孩子的眼前,承受你注定的命运吧!那么,为了你可以活下去,把这药吃下去。”

海丝特·白兰无需再听劝告,也没有再加拖延,使举杯将药一饮而尽,然后,按照这个手段高明的男人的示意,坐到了孩子睡着的床上;面他则拉过牢房中唯一的一把椅子,坐在她的旁边。她面对这种种安排,不由得局身颤栗起来;因为她感觉到——在完成这一切由人道或原则,或者,果真如此的话,由一种优雅的残忍迫使他做出这些解脱她肉体上痛苦的事情之后——下一步,他就要作为被她无可挽回地深深伤害了的人来对待她了。
回复 支持 反对

使用道具 举报

1万

主题

2万

帖子

16万

金币

大家网博士后

Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22

积分
98524
 楼主| 发表于 2009-6-18 15:43 | 显示全部楼层
"Hester," said he, "I ask not wherefore, nor how, thou hast fallen into the pit, or say, rather, thou hast ascended to the pedestal of infamy, on which I found thee. The reason is not far to seek. It was my folly, and thy weakness. I- a man of thought- the bookworm of great libraries- a man already in decay, having given my best years to feed the hungry dream of knowledge- what had I to do with youth and beauty like thine own! Misshapen from my birth-hour, how could I delude myself with the idea that intellectual gifts might veil physical deformity in a young girl's fantasy! Men call me wise. If sages were ever wise in their own behoof, I might have foreseen all this. I might have known that, as I came out of the vast and dismal forest, and entered this settlement of Christian men, the very first object to meet my eyes would be thyself, Hester Prynne, standing up, a statue of ignominy, before the people. Nay, from the moment when we came down the old churchsteps together, a married pair, I might have beheld the bale-fire of that scarlet letter blazing at the end of our path!"

"Thou knowest," said Hester- for, depressed as she was, she could not endure this last quiet stab at the token of her shame- "thou knowest that I was frank with thee. I felt no love, nor feigned any."

"True," replied he. "It was my folly! I have said it. But, up to that epoch of my life, I had lived in vain. The world had been so cheerless! My heart was a habitation large enough for many guests, but lonely and chill, and without a household fire. I longed to kindle one! It seemed not so wild a dream- old as I was, and sombre as I was, and misshapen as I was- that the simple bliss, which is scattered far and wide, for all mankind to gather up, might yet be mine. And so, Hester, I drew thee into my heart, into its innermost chamber, and sought to warm thee by the warmth which thy presence made there!"

"I have greatly wronged thee," murmured Hester.

"We have wronged each other," answered he. "Mine was the first wrong, when I betrayed thy budding youth into a false and unnatural relation with my decay. Therefore, as a man who has not thought and philosophised in vain, I seek no vengeance, plot no evil against thee. Between thee and me the scale hangs fairly balanced. But, Hester, the man lives who has wronged us both! Who is he?"

"Ask me not!" replied Hester Prynne, looking firmly into his face. "That thou shalt never know!"

"Never, sayest thou?" rejoined he, with a smile of dark and self-relying intelligence. "Never know him! Believe me, Hester, there are few things- whether in the outward world, or, to a certain depth, in the invisible sphere of thought- few things hidden from the man who devotes himself earnestly and unreservedly to the solution of a mystery. Thou mayest cover up thy secret from the prying multitude. Thou mayest conceal it, too, from the ministers and magistrates, even as thou didst this day, when they sought to wrench the name out of thy heart, and give thee a partner on thy pedestal. But, as for me, I come to the inquest with other senses than they possess. I shall seek this man, as I have sought truth in books; as I have sought gold in alchemy. There is a sympathy that will make me conscious of him. I shall see him tremble. I shall feel myself shudder, suddenly and unawares. Sooner or later, he must needs be mine!"

The eyes of the wrinkled scholar glowed so intensely upon her, that Hester Prynne clasped her hands over her heart, dreading lest he should read the secret there at once.

"Thou wilt not reveal his name? Not the less he is mine," resumed he, with a look of confidence, as if destiny were at one with him. "He bears no letter of infamy wrought into his garment, as thou dost; but I shall read it on his heart. Yet fear not for him! Think not that I shall interfere with Heaven's own method of retribution, or, to my own loss, betray him to the gripe of human law. Neither do thou imagine that I shall contrive aught against his life; no, nor against his fame, if, as I judge, he be a man of fair repute. Let him live! Let him hide himself in outward honour, if he may! Not the less he shall be mine!"

"Thy acts are like mercy," said Hester, bewildered and appalled. "But thy words interpret thee as a terror!"

"One thing, thou that wast my wife, I would enjoin upon thee," continued the scholar. "Thou hast kept the secret of thy paramour. Keep, likewise, mine! There are none in this land that know me. Breathe not, to any human soul, that thou didst ever call me husband! Here, on this wild outskirt of the earth, I shall pitch my tent; for, elsewhere a wanderer, and isolated from human interests, I find here a woman, a man, a child, amongst whom and myself there exist the closest ligaments. No matter whether of love or hate; no matter whether of right or wrong! Thou and thine, Hester Prynne, belong to me. My home is where thou art, and where he is. But betray me not!"

"Wherefore dost thou desire it?" inquired Hester, shrinking, she hardly knew why, from this secret bond. "Why not announce thyself openly, and cast me off at once?"

"It may be," he replied, "because I will not encounter the dishonour that besmirches the husband of a faithless woman. It may be for other reasons. Enough, it is my purpose to live and die unknown. Let, therefore, thy husband be to the world as one already dead, and of whom no tidings shall ever come. Recognise me not, by word, by sign, by look! Breathe not the secret, above all, to the man thou wottest of. Shouldst thou fail me in this, beware! His fame, his position, his life, will be in my hands. Beware!"

"I will keep thy secret, as I have his," said Hester.

"Swear it!" rejoined he.

And she took the oath.

"And now, Mistress Prynne," said old Roger Chillingworth, as he was hereafter to be named, "I leave thee alone; alone with thy infant, and the scarlet letter! How is it, Hester? Doth thy sentence bind thee to wear the token in thy sleep? Art thou not afraid of nightmares and hideous dreams?"

"Why dost thou smile so at me?" inquired Hester, troubled at the expression of his eyes. "Art thou like the Black Man that haunts the forest round about us? Hast thou enticed me into a bond that will prove the ruin of my soul?"

"Not thy soul," he answered, with another smile. "No, not thy soul."
回复 支持 反对

使用道具 举报

1万

主题

2万

帖子

16万

金币

大家网博士后

Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22Rank: 22

积分
98524
 楼主| 发表于 2009-6-18 15:43 | 显示全部楼层
“海丝特,”他说,“我不对你盘诘:出于什么原因或以何种方式,你堕入了深渊,或者宁可说,你登上了耻辱的刑台——我正是在那儿见到你的。原因唾手可寻。那就是我的愚蠢和你的软弱。我,——一个有头脑的人,——一个博览群书的蛀书虫,——一个已经老朽的人,已经把我的大好年华都用来充实我对知识的饥渴之梦了,——我与你这样的青春与美貌已经无关了!我生来畸形,我怎能自欺,竟以为知识和智能可以在年轻站娘的心目中掩盖肉体的缺陷!人们都认为我聪明,如果智者有自知之明,我早就该预见到这一切了。我原先就应料到,当我走出那浩渺的莽林,步入这基督徒的居位区别,首先映入我眼帘的就是你本人,海丝特·白兰,作为不光彩的形象,高高站在众人面前。唉,从我们新婚燕尔,一起走下那古老教堂的门防的那一刻起,我就应该看到:在我们道路的尽头燃着红字的熊熊烈火!”  

“你知道,”海丝特说,——尽管她十分沮丧,但依旧无法忍受刚才在她耻辱的标记上那平和的一戳——“你知道我一向对你很坦率。我没有感受到爱情,我也不想装假。”

“的确,”他回答说。“那是我的愚蠢!我刚才已经说过了。不过,直到我生命的那一刻为止,我都白活了。整个世界都是那么郁郁寡欢,我的心宽敞得可以容下好多客人,但孤寂而凄凉,没有一处家居的壁炉。我多盼望能点燃一护火啊!看来这并非非分之想,——尽管我年老,我阴沉,我畸形,——可这种天南地北人人都可以用来温暖自己的最朴素的福份,我也能够享有才是。于是,海丝特,我就把你装进了心窝:放进最深的地方,想用你给我的温暖来温暖你!”

“我让你太受委屈了,”海丝特讷讷着说。

“我们彼此都让对方受了委屈,”他回答说。“是我先委屈了你,我把你含苞的青春同我这朽木错误地、不自然地嫁接在一起,从而断送了你。因此,作为一个没有白白具有思想而且懂得哲理的人,我对你既不谋求报复,也不怀有邪念。在你我之间,天平保持了相当的平衡。不过,那个坑害了你我二人的人还活着,海丝特!他是谁?”

“不要问我!”海丝特·白兰定睛望着他的面孔回答说。“这一点你永远不会知道的!”

“永远不,你是这么说的吗?”他接口说,脸上露出阴沉和自信的笑意。“永远不会知道他!相信我吧,海丝特,还没有什么事情,——无论是在外部世界上的,还是在不可见的某种思想深处之中的——都没有什么事情能够逃过一个对解决神秘问题孜孜以求的人的眼睛。你可以对那些刨根问底的群众隐藏你的秘密。你也可以对那些牧师和大人们掩饰你的秘密,即使在他们象今天所作的那样,竭力想把那人的名字从你心中挤轧出来,让你们结伴示众的时候,也是枉然。至于我呢,我要用他们所不具备的其它感觉来寻求答案。我要象我在书本中探索真理、用炼金术提炼黄金那样去找出这个男人。我可以靠一种共同感应来觉察出他来。我要看着他浑身战抖。我会突然而不自主地感到自己在颤栗。或迟或早,他必将落入我的掌握之中!”

那个满脸皱纹的学者的眼睛,亮闪闪地死盯住海丝特·白兰,直逼得她用双手紧紧捂住胸口,唯恐他马上从那儿读到她的秘密,

“你不想说出他的名字吗?反正他逃不出我的手心,”他接着说,露出得意的神情,似乎是他在主宰命运。“他的衣服上没有象你一样缝着耻辱的字毋;但我仍可以洞察他的内心。不过不必为他担心!不要以为我会扰乱上天的惩治方法,或者,把他揭露出来,诉请人间的法律去制裁,那样我会得不偿失。你也不要猜想我会设法勾消他的生命;不,我也不会诋毁他的名誉的,要是我判断得对,他是一个颇有名望的人。让他活着吧!反正他逃不出我的手心!”

“你的行动象是在发慈悲,”海丝特困惑面惊恐地说。“可你的言辞只能让人感到害怕!”

“既然你曾经是我的妻子,我要求你必须做到一点,”那学者继续说。“你始终不肖泄露你的奸夫。那就也为我保密吧!这地方没人认识我。绝对不要对任何人露一点口风,说我曾经是你的丈夫?这里,在地球的这块蛮荒野地里,我要扎下我的帐篷,因为在别的地方我也是一个飘泊者,与世人的兴趣隔绝,但在这里我发现了一个女人、一个男人、一个孩子,我和他们之间存在着最紧密的联系。不管是爱还是恨;也不管是对还是错!你和你的人,海丝特·白兰,都属于我。你在哪儿,他在哪儿,我的家就安在哪儿。但你别把我泄露出去!”

“你为什么要这样呢?”海丝特怯生生地问,她也说不清她怎么会由于这一秘密的约束而畏缩了。“你为什么不公开站出来,把我立刻抛弃呢?”

“可能是,”他答道,“因为我不愿意蒙受一个不忠实的女人给丈夫带来玷辱。也许是别的什么原因。总之,我的目标是生生死死不为人所知。因此,让这里的人都以为你丈夫已经死了吧,关于他,不应再有任何消息了。无论从言谈间,从表情上,还是从动作上,都要装作不认识我!别露一点口风,尤其对你恋着的那个男人。要是你在这点上坏了我的事,你就小心点吧!他的名誉,他的地位,他的生命,全都握在我的手心里。当心吧!”

“我将象为他保密一样来为你保密,”海丝特说。

“发个誓吧!”他接茬说。

她于是起了誓。

“现在,白兰太太,”老罗杰·齐灵渥斯说——从今以后我们就这么称呼他了,“我丢下你不管了!让你和你的婴儿,还有那红字,一起过日子吧!怎么样,海丝特?判决是不是规定你睡觉时也要佩着那标记?你难道不怕睡魇和凶梦吗?”

“你干嘛要这样子冲我笑?”海丝特对着他的目光费解地问。“你打算象那个在森林里作祟的黑男人一样纠缠着我们吗?你是不是已经把我引进了一个圈套,证明我的灵魂给毁绰了呢?”

“不是你的灵魂,”他说着,又露齿一笑。“不,不是你的!”

①巴拉塞尔苏斯(1493一1941),瑞士的炼金术士和医生。
回复 支持 反对

使用道具 举报

您需要登录后才可以回帖 登录 | 注册

本版积分规则

诚聘英才|移动端|Archiver|版权声明|大家论坛 ( 京ICP备06071611号,京公网安备11010802018363号 )

GMT+8, 2021-9-22 10:28 , Processed in 0.550696 second(s), 22 queries .

Powered by Discuz!

© Comsenz Inc.

快速回复 返回顶部 返回列表